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Fostering research collaborations with the private sector

Fostering research collaborations with the private sector

Boccanfuso met with members of the university’s research leadership on Main Campus and at the Health Sciences Center, STC.UNM’s President and CEO, and the Deputy Secretary of the New Mexico Economic Development Department. Boccanfuso also presented at the Anderson School of Management where he shared his insights on university-industry partnerships and discussed modes for bolstering partnerships with the industry. The UIDP is a non-profit organization comprised of leading innovation companies and highly regarded research universities from around the world that work together to find better ways to partner and increase the benefits from collaborations between the sectors.

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Visiting scholar examines language changes in northern New Mexico February 04, 2020

Visiting scholar examines language changes in northern New Mexico February 04, 2020

Gorman is an assistant professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Arizona and serves as director of the Spanish as a Heritage Language Program, the largest in the nation. Gorman’s research centers on what she describes as “ethno-linguistic contact zones.” Her work seeks to understand how present-day Mexican immigration is shaping language use and identity across the Southwest and in New Mexico in particular. While at UNM, she’ll work to complete her book manuscript, Ethnolinguistic Contact Zones: U.S. Latina/o Identities and Language among Mexican-Nuevomexicanos in northern New Mexico. By utilizing resources at UNM, Gorman plans to engage in additional ethnographic data collection.

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PTSD research to examine less-studied effects

PTSD research to examine less-studied effects

Researchers Pilar Sanjuan, a research assistant professor at the UNM Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, & Addictions (CASAA), and Julia Stephen, a professor of Translational Neuroscience at the UNM Mind Research Network (MRN), along with their team, recently received an award for $475,751 from the National Institute of Mental Health to study people with PTSD in an effort to find solutions to the not-so-well studied issues associated with PTSD. Active duty and veteran service members deployed within the past 10 years interested in participating in the study should contact Gleichmann at 505-272-3304 or dgleichmann@mrn.org.

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UNM professor honored by book dedication

UNM professor honored by book dedication

In the introduction of the book, his European colleagues wrote, “One of the high points of the conference was the thematic session organized in honor of Prof. Lawrence Guy Straus, whose seminal and extensive work on the Solutrean adaptations in Northern Iberia has strongly influenced all developments in LGM studies across Iberia and beyond. Prof. Straus is now retired, but we hope that he can keep contributing for many years with his invaluable insights on the Late Pleistocene adaptations in Western Europe. He authored the first chapter of this book, and we gratefully dedicate the whole volume to him and his remarkable career.”

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Crossey named prestigious AAAS Fellow

Crossey named prestigious AAAS Fellow

Dr. Laura Crossey, a professor in The University of New Mexico's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). This year, Crossey is one of 443 members who will be among those honored at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2020 AAAS Annual Meeting in Seattle, Wash. on Feb 15. The Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section in the journal Science in its Nov. 29 issue.

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UNM associate professor studies the neurological origin of pleasure

UNM associate professor studies the neurological origin of pleasure

Associate Professor James Cavanagh’s research, funded by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, seeks to identify a consistent quantifiable indicator of anhedonia, or the inability to feel pleasure. Cavanagh believes that he has found an observable neurological phenomenon, known as Reward Positivity (RewP), which indicates the occurrence of this reward process. A reduced or absent RewP response to normally rewarding stimuli, he hypothesizes, indicates anhedonia. Throughout this research, Cavanagh and his team will use UNM Center for Advanced Research Computing (CARC) resources to process the data they collect.

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Shen named PNM Chair for Renewable Energy Research

Shen named PNM Chair for Renewable Energy Research

The holder of the PNM chair is responsible for allocating the funds in the account. Shen said that funding from the PNM endowment will be used toward renewable energy-related research, such as the mechanics and reliability of photovoltaic devices and packages. The mechanical engineering department also has a variety of research activities on all major forms of renewable energy — including wind and solar — as well as student capstone design programs involving alternative power systems, such as the solar boat and the electric car. Shen said he is extremely grateful for being selected as the endowed chair.

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Straus recognized by former students for decades of anthropological discoveries

Distinguished Professor lives by the ‘Golden Rule’

It’s fair to say that Lawrence Straus has made his mark in the anthropological world with his share of incredible discoveries during an illustrious academic career spanning nearly five decades. [H]is research in the anthropological world has only been equaled by his work as an advisor, mentor and professor to thousands of students during the course of his incredible 44-year career at UNM including three years as a working retiree. Now, a group of former students and colleagues has honored Straus with a Festschrift, a collection of articles titled, Recent advances in quaternary prehistory: Papers in honor of Lawrence Guy Straus, published by Quaternary International.

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UNM alumna honored for research on vanishing languages

UNM alumna honored for research on vanishing languages

Shelece Easterday, who received her Ph.D. in linguistics from The University of New Mexico in 2017, has received this year’s Joseph Greenberg Award from the Association for Linguistic Typology for the best piece of typological research embodied in a doctoral dissertation. Her award-winning dissertation is entitled Highly Complex Syllable Structure: A Typological Study of its Phonological Characteristics and Diachronic Development.

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