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Making the simple complex: synchronization researchers dive into the ‘messy’

Making the simple complex: synchronization researchers dive into the ‘messy’

Most people see the ocean waves and vaguely wonder why some are big and some are small —or look into a roaring fire and are curious as to what makes the flames move as they do — with seemingly no rhyme or reason.
For most, these are passing curiosities to which little thought is given outside the moment. Just a mystery of life. But for those who study the issues of complexity and synchronization, they aren’t content with not

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Making waves in ultrasound technology

Making waves in ultrasound technology

After decades of medical dramas filling our TV screens, the figure of a technician wielding an ultrasound wand is so prolific, it’s easily called to mind. Even if you’ve never needed an internal abdominal exam, the steps are familiar: The clear, cool gel on the belly; the pressing of a sturdy, plastic device against the patient’s torso; the grainy images that appear on a nearby screen…

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Tasmanian 'devil in disguise' is key puzzle piece for understanding supercontinents

Tasmanian 'devil in disguise' is key puzzle piece for understanding supercontinents

A new paper recently released in Geology by researchers Jacob Mulder, Karl Karlstrom, and other Australian colleagues provides a new dataset that may resolve the more than three decades-long debate about which continents were adjacent to southwestern USA within the 1 billion year old supercontinent of Rodinia.

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UNM researcher delves into water politics affecting our state’s most beloved crop

UNM researcher delves into water politics affecting our state’s most beloved crop

Doctoral student Holly Brause packed her trunk this summer and hit the road for a lengthy drive down south. While most students travel for fun and to relax, Brause made the trip to roll up her sleeves and get to work on understanding how water issues are affecting New Mexico’s most treasured, above ground, resource. 

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NSF announces $750,000 EQuIP award for quantum information processing to The University of New Mexico

NSF announces $750,000 EQuIP award for quantum information processing to The University of New Mexico

The National Science Foundation announced today $6 million for quantum research as part of its RAISE-EQuIP: Frontiers of Quantum Engineering effort, an initiative designed to push the frontiers of engineering in quantum information science and technology.

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