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Professor honored with NSF CAREER Award

Professor honored with NSF CAREER Award

In the modern undergraduate engineering curriculum, design projects — where students apply their technical knowledge and creativity to solving real-life challenges — are an important part of preparing students for future careers.

However, these design projects are often pre-chosen for pupils, and have little relevance to the students’ lives – leaving them less invested in the project and diminishing the potential benefits of design thinking.

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Davis awarded third annual Community-Engaged Research Lectureship Award

Davis awarded third annual Community-Engaged Research Lectureship Award

One of the keys to successful work in a community-engaged approach to preventing disease and promoting healthy living is the creation of mutually beneficial partnerships. In community-based research, the inclusion of participants in every aspect of a study is important. It is beneficial to both researchers and community members alike.

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UNM CEPR receives funding to support evaluations of nontraditional schools

UNM CEPR receives funding to support evaluations of nontraditional schools

The University of New Mexico’s Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR) has begun a project to research and evaluate the suitability of current performance measures for New America Schools, public charter schools dedicated to serving recent immigrants and their families. The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has funded an award of $299,540 to CEPR for completing this two-year project, Nov. 2017 through Oct. 2019, to support this important mission-based evaluation research study.

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UNM anthropologists honored internationally for research

UNM anthropologists honored internationally for research

The University of New Mexico’s research at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon was recently honored with a Field Discovery Award at the Shanghai Archaeological Forum. The project is one of 10 chosen from more than 100 projects around the world.
“Their selection process seems to be very complicated, so it is truly an honor to be recognized by this group,” said Professor Patricia Crown, who was invited to Shanghai to receive the award.

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UNM researchers design patient repository for more effective EEG diagnoses

UNM researchers design patient repository for more effective EEG diagnoses

Researchers at The University of New Mexico hope a new open-source data sharing website will help bring scientists closer to effective diagnoses for psychiatric and neurological disorders. The Patient Repository for EEG Data + Computational Tools (PRED+CT: www.predictsite.com) aims to use novel analyses of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, or “brainwaves” in order to discover new patient biomarkers.

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University of New Mexico Inventors Elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors

University of New Mexico Inventors Elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors

Two Distinguished Professors from The University of New Mexico, Plamen Atanassov and Dr. Cheryl Willman, were among a cohort of 155 inventors from around the world elected as 2017 National Academy of Inventors Fellows.

Atanassov and Willman, who were nominated by the STC.UNM Board of Directors, now join a select group of more than 900 inventors representing over 250 countries worldwide who have been elected as NAI Fellows.

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High-altitude observatory sheds light on origin of excess anti-matter

High-altitude observatory sheds light on origin of excess anti-matter

A mountaintop observatory in Mexico, built and operated by an international team of scientists, has captured the first wide-angle view of gamma rays emanating from two rapidly spinning stars. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC, provided the fresh perspective on high-energy light streaming from these stellar neighbors, casting serious doubt on one possible explanation for a mysterious excess of anti-matter particles near Earth.

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Fighting fires before they spark

Fighting fires before they spark

With warm, dry summers comes a deadly caveat for the western United States: wildfires. Scientists say the hot, dry climates found west of the Mississippi, along with decades of fire suppression efforts, are creating a devastating and destructive combination – leading to fires like the ones currently burning in California.


It’s a problem biologists at The University of New Mexico are looking to put a damper on. Now, new research from UNM is giving forest and fire management teams across the country the upper hand in reducing the severity of these events.

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