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UNM study confirms cannabis flower is an effective mid-level analgesic medication for pain treatment

UNM study confirms cannabis flower is an effective mid-level analgesic medication for pain treatment

Using the largest database of real-time recordings of the effects of common and commercially available cannabis products in the United States (U.S.), researchers at The University of New Mexico (UNM) found strong evidence that cannabis can significantly alleviate pain, with the average user experiencing a three-point drop in pain suffering on a 0-10 point scale immediately following cannabis consumption. [Jacob] Vigil explains, “Cannabis offers the average patient an effective alternative to using opioids for general use in the treatment of pain with very minimal negative side effects for most people.”

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Research examines ramifications of climate change on different populations

Research examines ramifications of climate change on different populations

As the world struggles to battle the effects of climate change, not everyone benefits equally from the remedies. In a recent paper titled Weaponizing vulnerability to climate change, Benjamin Warner, an assistant professor of geography and environmental studies at The University of New Mexico, and his colleague Kimberley Thomas, a political ecologist at Temple University, examine the way the fight to remediate climate change is hurting the most vulnerable, the poor.

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Hard-to-count: ensuring New Mexico is accurately represented in the 2020 Census

Hard-to-count: ensuring New Mexico is accurately represented in the 2020 Census

According to research from George Washington University, a projected $6.2 billion is on the line next year that would go to the 16 biggest Federal Assistance Programs in New Mexico, including Medicaid, SNAP benefits, highway planning and construction, housing, and grant programs for early childhood education and special ed. Because of the low response numbers in 2010, along with several other factors, New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham established a commission, funding it with about $3.5 million approved by the legislature, to ensure an accurate and complete count.

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UNM Distinguished Professor Emeritus Henry Ellis dies

UNM Distinguished Professor Emeritus Henry Ellis dies

Ellis was born on Sunday, Oct. 23, 1927 in New Bern, N.C. His family later moved to Norfolk, Va., where he spent his childhood. He served in the United States Air Force as a medical laboratory technician from 1946 through 1947. Ellis married his wife, Florence, in 1957 and they moved to Albuquerque, where he began his career with the Psychology Department at UNM. Ellis worked as an active researcher and psychology professor at UNM for more than 50 years, serving as Department Chairman of from 1972 to 1984. He had more than 120 publications, with 10 books among them, to his credit.

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New Mexico in Focus examines vaccine with potential to prevent Alzheimer's disease

New Mexico in Focus examines vaccine with potential to prevent Alzheimer's disease

NMiF takes a multi-layered look at social, political, economic health, education, and arts issues, and explores them in-depth, with a critical eye to give them context beyond the "news of the moment." This week on New Mexico in Focus, correspondent Megan Kamerick sits down with researchers at The University of New Mexico School of Medicine who have developed a vaccine that carries the tantalizing possibility of preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

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Research shows more bikes equal safer roads for all

Research shows more bikes equal safer roads for all

Ferenchak said this study builds on a previous one that found that bike-heavy cities were safer. The hypothesis at the beginning of this study was that bike-heavy cities were safer because there were more bike riders, so the assumption was that there is safety in numbers. But looking at the data, the researchers found that the key factor in safety is not the number of bikers, but the number of facilities provided to bikers, such as protected bike lanes.

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UNM paves the road into the future for Quantum Information Science

UNM paves the road into the future for Quantum Information Science

The University of New Mexico was one of 25 universities invited to the White House Academic Roundtable on Quantum Information Science on May 31, 2019 in Washington, D.C. to discuss the “significant role that academia plays in Quantum Information Science and its impact on America's prosperity and security." Gabriel López, Vice President for Research, was in attendance representing UNM and its interests as the participants discussed the implementation of the newly-signed National Quantum Initiative (NQI) to support multidisciplinary research and training in QIS.

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New UNM study aims to learn why particular treatments work for alcohol use disorders

New UNM study aims to learn why particular treatments work for alcohol use disorders

In 2015 approximately 16 million people in the United States had an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), including 15.1 million adults and about 625,000 adolescents ages 12–17. About twice as many men as women have an AUD. There are numerous approaches to treatment for AUD that are effective in reducing alcohol use during treatment, leaving clinicians, researchers and others in the field wondering why treatments are effective and which treatments may be most effective for specific individuals.

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Meltwater research vital to water sustainability

Meltwater research vital to water sustainability

Mountainous snowpack is particularly consequential because it accounts for a majority of water supply in many parts of the West, and in order to make informed water policies, we must first understand the science behind snowpack and how it interacts with the environment. While many research projects focus on interactions between snowpack and soil, there is a major knowledge gap regarding “meltwater,” which is liquid water trapped between the mountain soil and the frozen snow.

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UNM team to present design project in NYC

UNM team to present design project in NYC

A team of students, under the leadership of Andrea Polli, a professor at The University of New Mexico's College of Fine Arts and associate professor of Computer Science at the UNM School of Engineering, has been working on a project called BioShield, a product synthesized from a woman's own tears that masks the biochemical signals of her ovulatory cycle for the purposes of privacy, protection, and control.

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