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UNM scientist pursues ultrafast laser technology to increase network speeds tenfold

UNM scientist pursues ultrafast laser technology to increase network speeds tenfold

A project to develop new ultrafast laser transmitter technology at The University of New Mexico is expected to have a revolutionary impact on the physics of semiconductor lasers, with potential applications that could result in ten times the speed of current fiber optic networks.

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Warming news from Russia

Warming news from Russia

A new paper by UNLV Geoscience graduate student Jon Baker has hot implications for the climate future of Russia. Baker, working with UNLV Geoscience Professor Matthew Lachniet and colleagues Yemane Asmerom and Victor Polyak at The University of New Mexico, and Russian colleagues, have produced an 11,000 year-long climate record from the Ural Mountains of Russia that shows nearly continuous warming from the end of the last Ice Age to the present.

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Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted

The University of New Mexico Is Among Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016

ALBUQURQUE, New Mexico. June 6, 2017—The University of New Mexico (UNM) is among the Top 100 Worldwide Universities granted U.S. utility patents in 2016. The report is published by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) and uses data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report ranks the University of New Mexico 33rd among the top 100 for the number of issued U.S. utility patents received in 2016 for its inventions. The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that list a university as the first assignee on the issued patent. “We made a significant leap this year to 33rd in the world from 2015’s ranking of 47th,” said Lisa Kuuttila, CEO & Chief Economic Development Officer of STC.UNM, the University’s technology-transfer and economic-development organization. “Since 2013 when we were 56 among the top 100, we’ve climbed at a steady pace. Universities and university inventors are innovators and drivers of economic growth.” “There is no question that the patents received each year by UNM inventors are a confirmation of the research quality and market potential of their new discoveries. However, the patents are equally important because they protect the inventors’ intellectual property rights. Our patented technologies are essential to the companies who want to license them and to our start-up companies who need investors to help them bring these new technologies to the marketplace. This relationship between patents and commercialization activity has an undeniable positive impact on local and global economies.” “We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to our UNM inventors. They are the reason we continue to do so well among institutions around the world. They are our unsung heroes!” The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 can be found at http://www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf

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Why an Amazonian tribe has the lowest rate of heart disease of any global population

Why an Amazonian tribe has the lowest rate of heart disease of any global population

Time, Newsweek, Health Magazine—and many other international media outlets from the United Kingdom to Australia—are all talking about the recent findings by a group of doctors and anthropologists who have found why a South American population has the lowest rate of heart disease—a disease that is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S.


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UNM awarded NSF ADVANCE grant to create institutional transformation across STEM fields

UNM awarded NSF ADVANCE grant to create institutional transformation across STEM fields

For decades, women have been significantly underrepresented in the faculty ranks, especially in the higher levels of academia in nearly all Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. Some say not enough attention has been paid to the recruitment, retention and advancement of women and minorities.


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UNM research reveals big benefits to housing homeless population

UNM research reveals big benefits to housing homeless population

A new report from The University of New Mexico Institute for Social Research (ISR) could help change the way cities, counties and states deal with homelessness. The study, which researchers say is one of the most comprehensive looks at the economic impact of homelessness to-date, shows it actually costs less to house chronically homeless people than to leave them on the streets.


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Heinrich announces funding for Innovative STEM Education Program at KAFB

Heinrich announces funding for Innovative STEM Education Program at KAFB

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, recently announced $25 million in authorized funding for the continuation of the nationwide STARBASE program, which motivates fifth grade students to explore Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) through hands-on learning in collaboration with military installations.


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