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Making the simple complex: synchronization researchers dive into the ‘messy’

Making the simple complex: synchronization researchers dive into the ‘messy’

Most people see the ocean waves and vaguely wonder why some are big and some are small —or look into a roaring fire and are curious as to what makes the flames move as they do — with seemingly no rhyme or reason.
For most, these are passing curiosities to which little thought is given outside the moment. Just a mystery of life. But for those who study the issues of complexity and synchronization, they aren’t content with not

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'The Science and Politics of Climate Change: Tales of a Turbulent System'

'The Science and Politics of Climate Change: Tales of a Turbulent System'

For Professor David Gutzler, and like-minded colleagues and individuals, the evidence is as clear as New Mexico’s blue skies – climate change is here, and it is past time to start thinking about doing something to mitigate the issue.

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Making waves in ultrasound technology

Making waves in ultrasound technology

After decades of medical dramas filling our TV screens, the figure of a technician wielding an ultrasound wand is so prolific, it’s easily called to mind. Even if you’ve never needed an internal abdominal exam, the steps are familiar: The clear, cool gel on the belly; the pressing of a sturdy, plastic device against the patient’s torso; the grainy images that appear on a nearby screen…

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Showcasing advanced degree projects at UNM

Showcasing advanced degree projects at UNM

While universities used to be focused on specialization in a student’s chosen field, higher education is moving more and more toward interdisciplinary learning. The University of New Mexico is no different, and the Shared Knowledge Conference showcases and celebrates the myriad work being done by graduate students.

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Tasmanian 'devil in disguise' is key puzzle piece for understanding supercontinents

Tasmanian 'devil in disguise' is key puzzle piece for understanding supercontinents

A new paper recently released in Geology by researchers Jacob Mulder, Karl Karlstrom, and other Australian colleagues provides a new dataset that may resolve the more than three decades-long debate about which continents were adjacent to southwestern USA within the 1 billion year old supercontinent of Rodinia.

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