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Earthquake, tsunami hazards might be higher than current estimates

Earthquake, tsunami hazards might be higher than current estimates

Two of the most destructive forces of nature – earthquakes and tsunamis – might be more of a threat than current estimates according to new research conducted by scientists at UNM and the Nanyang Technological University.

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UNM teams up with international researchers to study snowmelt

UNM teams up with international researchers to study snowmelt

Right now, 99.7 percent of New Mexico is in a severe drought, 82.2 percent is in extreme drought and 53.4 percent is facing exceptional drought – all of which create considerable strain on local communities, agricultural efforts and wildlife.

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Researchers look for immunological solutions in opossums

Researchers look for immunological solutions in opossums

In a paper titled The molecular assembly and architecture of the marsupial γµ T cell receptor defines a third T cell lineage published in the prestigious journal Science, an international team of scientists from The University of New Mexico, Monash University in Australia, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health has defined a novel T cell lineage, called γµ T cells, found only in marsupials, such as kangaroos and opossums, and monotremes such as the duckbill platypus.

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Researchers develop chip that improves testing and tracing for COVID-19

Researchers develop chip that improves testing and tracing for COVID-19

Jeremy Edwards, director of the Computational Genomics and Technology (CGaT) Laboratory at The University of New Mexico, and his colleagues at Centrillion Technologies in Palo Alto, Calif. and West Virginia University, have developed a chip that provides a simpler and more rapid method of genome sequencing for viruses like COVID-19.

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UNM study: Sneeze guards could make full-capacity airplanes safer from COVID-19 spread

UNM study: Sneeze guards could make full-capacity airplanes safer from COVID-19 spread

But the findings of a study led by researchers from The University of New Mexico and Imperial College London suggest that nonporous plastic shields (often called “sneeze guards”) installed between seats can prevent significant amounts of COVID-19 particles from being transmitted between passengers, thus allowing for fuller airplanes, and in turn, more revenue for airlines.

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